{T} Travel Postcard #7: Tibetan Prayer Wheels


Traditionally, the mantra Om Mani Padme Hum is written in Sanskrit on the outside of the wheel. Also sometimes depicted are Dakinis, Protectors and very often the 8 auspicious symbols Ashtamangala. According to the Tibetan Buddhist tradition based on the lineage texts regarding prayer wheels, spinning such a wheel will have much the same meritorious effect as orally reciting the prayers. – Wikipedia.com

Every time I visit a monastery, I am struck by a few things: the cleanliness and aura of peacefulness; the gorgeous, brightly colored tangka paintings and murals adorning the walls; the larger-than-life statutes of the various avatars of Buddha, and the prayer wheel outside most monasteries.

Every time I walk around a monastery, running my hand along the prayer wheels, I feel a sense of peace and calm descend over me. Once, I even managed to work through a particular problem that had been plaguing me since a while. Monasteries, along with churches, often have this effect on me.

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  1. I understand that the words “Om mani pemme hum” is written in pali language, which is of course “om Mani padme hum” in Sanskrit. Buddhist temples have a very calming effect as there is hardly any noise within.

  2. I feel the same when I visit my hometown church. Peaceful and usually ends me having teary eyes. Guilt that I feel like I’ve not visit as often as before when I was still living on my hometown.

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