{Z} Let’s Zentangle!


A Zentangle tile that was gifted to me recently

Yes, it’s a real thing! The Zentangle® method was created by Rick Roberts and Maria Thomas and is an easy-to-learn, relaxing, and fun way to create beautiful images by drawing structured patterns. It increases focus and creativity, provides artistic satisfaction, and an increased sense of personal well being. And all you need to get started is paper, pencil and a black pen.

If you look up Zentangles on the internet, you’ll find some stunningly intricate tangle designs. Although they look really complicated, they are actually very simple and easy to do. The best way to start is to cut out a square from cardstock – whatever size you’d like, though the official Zentangle tile is a 3.5 inch square. Draw a string. This is basically a random line that creates an area in which you will draw tangle patterns. Start filling in tangle patterns in each area. It’s as simple as that!

A word about strings

A Zentangle tile that was gifted to me recently

A Zentangle tile that was gifted to me recently

Strings are always drawn in pencil so that they disappear into your completed Zentangle. They provide the foundation that can help you to create a completed Zentangle without over-thinking or planning the process. Think of it as the container for your tangles.

It can be difficult to come up with strings – especially when you’re just starting. Tangle Patterns is a fabulous resource to find string patterns.

A word about tangles

Tangles are slightly more structured doodles. And there are tons and tons of patterns available online for free. Again, Tangle Patterns is my go-to resource for finding amazing tangles. There are also a lot of simple tangle patterns on my doodling Pinterest board – perfect for when you are just starting out!

Do visit the official Zentangle website for more details on this meditative art form.

Put this lesson to work: Cut out a 3.5 inch square from a piece of cardstock, chart paper or even regular printer paper and create a Zentangle.

And it’s a wrap!

I hope you’ve had as much fun learning about art journaling all this month as I have had conceptualizing and structuring these posts and sharing my love for art with you!

If you’ve enjoyed this series and like my art work, do take a look at my recently set up cupic portfolio, from where you can purchase some of my art prints, cards, notebooks and posters. I’ll be adding a lot more art there soon, so keep an eye out for some exciting launches!

I will be sharing more art related posts in the future, as well as my more regular posts on book reviews, soulful living, et al., as well as a whole new series on digital artistry. I’d love for you to join me on the ride!

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  1. Zentangling has been on my wishlist. But, I am not so creatively inclined though I can appreciate it.
    Congrats on completing the AtoZ.

    • That’s the beauty of zentangling. If you look up the patterns, they give you step-by-step instructions on how to draw them. Just practice a few times, and it’s easy!

  2. Ahh, so that’s what these beautiful creations are called, never knew this! What a spectacular month this has been! Lovely connecting with you and reading your wonderful posts! You must continue this series! Congrats on completing the journey so well!
    @KalaRavi16 from

  3. It still sounds a bit complicated to me, but I may try, at some point. It often happens that trying is simpler that trying to understand 😉

    I kno wI’m late, but congratulation on completing the challenge. I’ve fallen so muc behind in the end, but I’m trying to catch up with everyone.
    It was a nice journey, thanks for sharing 🙂

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