Reading wrap-up for April

Quote from A History of Objects by Carlo Pizzati

April was quite an interesting reading month. I read a nice variety of books, including one that was on my to-read list since years, but despite the raving reviews, it didn’t do anything for me.

Let’s start with the books I read as part of my Book Bingo challenge:

Continue reading

Book review: A History of Objects by Carlo Pizzati

From the back cover:

“A candy box reveals a son’s true feelings for his mother. A fish sculpture creeps into a budding and healthy relationship. A splint on a music teacher’s finger threatens to expose a secret.

Objects can come to hold great power over life and the course it takes. This collection of short stories explores the nuances of the human experience as objects of sentimental value, nostalgic appeal or cultural significance bear witness and shed light on all that remains unsaid. A History of Objects expertly demonstrates the ways in which the inanimate are far from lifeless.”

Continue reading

Reading wrap-up for March

Quote on confusion from Anxious people by Frederic Backman

I thought March was a slow reading month, until I pulled together the list of books I’ve read so far. I read a total of 6 books this month, one of which was a slow, involved read. I must say I’m pleasantly surprised!

First up are the three books that I read specifically for the Book Bingo challenge

Continue reading

Book review: Making a Life: Working by Hand and Discovering the Life You Are Meant to Live by Melanie Falick

Book review of Making a Life: Working by Hand and Discovering the Life You Are Meant to Live by Melanie Falick

Why do we make things by hand? And why do we make them beautiful? Led by the question of why working with our hands remains vital and valuable in the modern world, author and maker Melanie Falick went on a transformative, inspiring journey. Traveling across continents, she met quilters and potters, weavers and painters, metalsmiths, printmakers, woodworkers, and more, and uncovered truths that have been speaking to us for millennia yet feel urgently relevant today: We make in order to slow down. To connect with others. To express ideas and emotions, feel competent, create something tangible and long-lasting. And to feed the soul. In revealing stories and gorgeous original photographs, Making a Life captures all the joy of making and the power it has to give our lives authenticity and meaning.

Continue reading

4 binge worthy weekend reads

Wondering what to read this weekend? I’ve got some recommendations for you!

I don’t know about you, but I love spending the occasional weekend curled up with a book that I just cannot put down. Even better if it’s a thriller — or my latest book love — witchy / fantasy fiction.

Here are four recommendations, all of which I read and loved this month!

{Note: Click on the book images to purchase on Amazon India. These are affiliate links, which means I will earn a small commission at no extra cost to you}

Continue reading

The 2022 book bingo reading challenge

Read more, read widely in 2022!

The 2022 book bingo reading challenge

I’ve really enjoyed hosting the book bingo challenge these last two years, and have been blown away by how many of you joined in! Thank you for all of your comments, emails and Instagram DMs through the year — I loved being a part of your reading journey! And of course, I’m hosting the book bingo challenge again in 2022!

Read on for all the details, changes, and additions this year.

Continue reading

Reading round-up: 5 books set against the backdrop of war

5 books on war and conflict zones

It’s a well-known fact that reading makes us more empathetic. How could it not? When we read, especially fiction, we can easily put ourselves in the shoes of the protagonists. We recreate the scenes from books in our imaginations, inhabiting the world of the characters on the page. That’s one of the reasons why books are almost always better than movies – the imagined worlds we create in our mind can rarely be captured in quite the same way on screen.

For this reason, I believe that reading stories set during war and conflict can help us build more empathy towards all people. Rarely are things as black and white as the leading narratives of the news cycle and social media trends have us believe.

Continue reading

Book review: The Passenger by Daniel Hurst

She takes the same train every day. But this is a journey she’ll never forget.

Amanda’s done it! She’s finally managed to save up enough money to hand in her resignation so she can follow her dream of becoming a writer. She just has a few more days left to serve out her notice and then she can put that daily commute from Brighton to London behind her forever.

But then, on her commute home from London to Brighton, she meets a charming stranger – who seems to know everything about her. He delivers an ultimatum. She needs to give him the code for the safe where she keeps her savings before the train reaches Brighton – or she’ll never see [her daughter] Louise again. Convinced that the threat is real, Amanda is stunned, horrified. She knows she should give him the code, but she can’t. Because she also knows there is a terrible secret in that safe which will destroy her life and Louise’s too…

Continue reading

Book review: In A Deep Dark Wood by Tina Pritchard

What she saw in the wood would change her life forever...

In a deep dark wood by Tina Pritchard

While walking her dog Buddy in the woods behind her house, Fran stumbles upon a scene that will change the course of her life. In a somewhat secluded den around an old yew tree, she sees local teen Tyler standing on a crate, his hands tied behind his back, his mouth duct taped, and a noose around his head.  She sees the two men who have him tied up there. She sees them kick the crate and murder him.

Drawing on her years working in social services, Fran is able to keep her wits about her long enough to tell the police exactly what she saw. But the incident has left her shaken. No matter how hard she tries to get back to her normal life, Fran can’t shake off the guilt that assails her – could she have done something to save Tyler?

Continue reading

Book review: The Testament of Loki by Joanne Harris

After the massive reading block brought on by Murakami’s Sputnik Sweetheart last year, I decided to started the new year by reading one of my favorite authors – Joanne Harris.

I started the year with The Gospel of Loki, which is a delightful retelling of the stories of the Norse gods – from the viewpoint of the trickster god Loki.

If you’ve read Norse Gods by Neil Gaiman or any other author, you would be familiar with all of these stories, there’s nothing really new there.

But what happens after the gods fall at Ragnarok? Is that the end of the road for Odin, Loki, Thor, Freya, and all the other Aesir and Vanir? Or can they return to reclaim their lost glory?

Continue reading